Ukraine Considers Mobilizing Prisoners for Voluntary Non-Combat Roles

Ukraine considers mobilizing prisoners for non-combat roles to bolster military, raising ethical concerns over Geneva Convention violations, as Russia also recruits convicts for the war.

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Ukraine Considers Mobilizing Prisoners for Voluntary Non-Combat Roles

Ukraine Considers Mobilizing Prisoners for Voluntary Non-Combat Roles

Ukraine is exploring the possibility of mobilizing prisoners to form separate military units for voluntary non-combat roles, such as construction and defense structure work. Justice Minister Denys Maluska revealed that a draft law regarding this proposal is currently under parliamentary review.

The move aims to bolster Ukraine's military capabilities in the ongoing conflict with Russia. The proposed units would be voluntary and contractual, with prisoners serving in roles that do not require the use of weapons. Maluska emphasized that the modern army requires a lot of physical work beyond just shooting from a machine gun, and these units could contribute to tasks like building fortifications and infrastructure.

Why this matters: The consideration of mobilizing prisoners for non-combat roles highlights the challenges Ukraine faces in sustaining its military efforts against Russia. It also raises questions about the ethical and legal implications of involving prisoners in wartime activities, even if voluntary and non-combat in nature.

However, the proposal has raised concerns from experts that it could amount to a war crime. The Geneva Convention prohibits exposing prisoners of war to combat or dangerous conditions, regardless of coercion. The Ukrainian government is exploring this option as part of its efforts to bolster its military capabilities in the ongoing conflict with Russia.

The article notes that Russia has also been recruiting female convicts to bolster its military forces in the war in Ukraine, with over 100,000 convicts from Russian penal colonies reportedly conscripted to fight. The fate of many of these Russian female convicts is bleak, with most being killed or returning with serious injuries, according to a Ukrainian intelligence spokesperson.

Justice Minister Denys Maluska stated that the draft law currently under parliamentary review would provide certain guarantees to ensure the effective implementation of this measure. The proposed units would be voluntary and contractual, with prisoners serving in roles that do not require the use of weapons. This comes amid reports that Russia has been using prisons and 'mobs' in the Tauri region, and that criminal criminals from the Russian 'Sarmat' battalion have been involved in the murders of wounded soldiers.

Key Takeaways

  • Ukraine exploring using prisoners for non-combat military roles like construction.
  • Proposed units would be voluntary and contractual, avoiding weapons use.
  • Concerns raised over ethical and legal implications, potential war crimes.
  • Russia also recruiting female convicts to bolster military forces in Ukraine.
  • Ukraine drafting law to provide guarantees for effective implementation of measure.