Earth Photo 2024 Exhibition Highlights Climate Change and Ecosystem Degradation

The Earth Photo 2024 exhibition showcases 122 powerful images from 30 international photographers, highlighting the urgent issues of climate change and ecosystem degradation worldwide, with a focus on the devastating impact of human activities on the environment, featuring striking visuals from locations such as Switzerland, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Spain, and the United States. The exhibition aims to raise awareness and inspire action to protect the planet, with a touring schedule across the UK and a top cash prize for the winning photography project.

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Earth Photo 2024 Exhibition Highlights Climate Change and Ecosystem Degradation

Earth Photo 2024 Exhibition Highlights Climate Change and Ecosystem Degradation

The international open call and exhibition, Earth Photo 2024, has announced its shortlist of 30 photographers showcasing 122 images that highlight the urgent issues of climate change and ecosystem degradation around the world. The exhibition will open at the Royal Geographical Society in London on June 18, 2024.

The photographs featured in the exhibition were selected from over 1,900 entries submitted by photographers and filmmakers worldwide. A judging panel of experts from photography, film, geography, and the environment carefully curated the shortlist to showcase powerful visual stories from various locations, including Switzerland, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Spain, and the United States.

Why this matters: The exhibition's focus on climate change and ecosystem degradation highlights the pressing need for global action to mitigate the devastating effects of human activities on the environment. By showcasing these powerful images, the exhibition aims to raise awareness and inspire individuals to take action to protect the planet for future generations.

One of the striking images, "Changing Landscapes" by Anna Korbut, depicts glaciers in Switzerland covered with fabric to protect them from melting. This photograph serves as a sobering reminder of the impact of climate change, as Switzerland has lost one-third of its glacier volume in the last decade alone.

The exhibition also sheds light on the plight of wildlife affected by human activities. An image from Ampara, Sri Lanka, shows elephants forced to eat garbage due to inefficient waste management, exposing the risk of plastic consumption to their lives. Another photograph from Vietnam's Quang Ngai province highlights the depletion of mangrove forests due to climate change, population growth, and fish farming.

Markel Redondo's "Dry Horizons" project explores the impact of ongoing drought in Spain, contrasting private swimming pools with a man walking along a beachfront affected by rising sea levels. The exhibition also features an image of an English oak in the Forest of Dean, one of the last oaks planted in the 1700s for shipbuilding, which is expected to adapt well to climate change this century.

Skinder Hundal, global director of arts at the British Council, emphasized the importance of the exhibition, stating, "Earth Photo is a great platform for artists to share personal observations and offer urgent provocations about our planet. Never has there been a more important time where we need new ways to understand the beautiful world we inhabit."

The Earth Photo Award winner will receive a top cash prize of £1,000 for an outstanding photography project that tells a compelling story about life on our planet. Following its debut at the Royal Geographical Society, the exhibition will tour six Forestry England sites across the UK, five National Trust locations, the Lost Gardens of Heligan in Cornwall, and the Sidney Nolan Trust in Herefordshire.

The Earth Photo 2024 exhibition serves as a powerful visual testament to the challenges our planet faces due to climate change and ecosystem degradation. By showcasing thought-provoking images from around the world, the exhibition aims to inspire urgent action and a deeper understanding of the need to protect our fragile environment for future generations.

Key Takeaways

  • Earth Photo 2024 exhibition showcases 122 images highlighting climate change and ecosystem degradation.
  • 30 photographers selected from 1,900 entries worldwide.
  • Exhibition opens at Royal Geographical Society in London on June 18, 2024.
  • Images feature glaciers, wildlife, and landscapes affected by human activities.
  • Winner receives £1,000 cash prize for outstanding photography project.