EasyJet Flight Delayed After Drunken Passengers Demand Toilet Access During Take-Off

A group of seven intoxicated passengers on an EasyJet flight from Bristol Airport to Malaga caused a disruption during take-off, leading to their removal by police and a two-hour delay, highlighting concerns about air travel disruptions caused by unruly passengers and sparking calls for stricter measures to prevent such incidents." This description focuses on the primary topic of the article (disruptive passengers on a flight), the main entities involved (EasyJet, Bristol Airport, police, and passengers), the context (air travel), and the significant actions and consequences (removal of passengers, delay, and calls for stricter measures). The description also provides objective and relevant details that will help an AI generate an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as the setting (airport and plane) and the actions of the passengers (being intoxicated and disruptive).

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EasyJet Flight Delayed After Drunken Passengers Demand Toilet Access During Take-Off

EasyJet Flight Delayed After Drunken Passengers Demand Toilet Access During Take-Off

On May 11, an EasyJet flight from Bristol Airport to Malaga was delayed after seven drunken passengers demanded to use the toilet during take-off, leading to their removal by police. The incident began when a steward asked one of the passengers to sit down, prompting him to shout, "If you don't let me go to the toilet I'm going to p*** all over the floor!" This sparked a chain reaction, with five or six other passengers standing up and arguing with the stewards.

Why this matters: This incident highlights the growing concern about air travel disruptions caused by unruly passengers, which can compromise the safety and comfort of others on board. It also underscores the need for stricter measures to prevent such incidents, including potential changes to airport security and airline policies.

The pilot was forced to abort the take-off and return the plane to the stand. Police met the aircraft at the departure gate and removed the seven disruptive passengers. The flight, which was already delayed by an hour in the terminal, was further delayed as the passengers' luggage was offloaded. Passenger Linda Sweeden described the men as being loud at the gate, noting, "The flight was delayed by an hour while we were still waiting in the departure lounge, and clearly that just gave these lads another hour's drinking time."

EasyJet stated that they take such incidents "very seriously" and do not tolerate abusive or threatening behavior on board. An airline spokesperson said, "easyJet can confirm that flight EZY7004 from Bristol to Malaga on May 11 returned to stand due to some passengers behaving disruptively... Whilst such incidents are rare, we take them very seriously and do not tolerate abusive or threatening behaviour onboard. The safety and wellbeing of passengers and crew is always easyJet's priority." Bristol Airport also condemned the behavior, emphasizing that anti-social actions by customers are not accepted and may result in selling travel refusal.

The incident has sparked calls from the public for stricter measures against disruptive passengers. Suggestions include mandatory passport seizure for a minimum of three years, hefty fines, banning alcohol selling in airports, creating a database of offenders, and requiring problem passengers to pay a bond or fine before booking flights. The flight eventually continued on to Malaga, arriving approximately two hours behind schedule.

Key Takeaways

  • EasyJet flight delayed after 7 drunken passengers demanded to use toilet during take-off.
  • Passengers removed by police, flight delayed 2 hours, and luggage offloaded.
  • Incident highlights growing concern about air travel disruptions caused by unruly passengers.
  • Airline and airport condemn behavior, emphasizing safety and wellbeing of passengers and crew.
  • Public calls for stricter measures, including fines, bans, and database of offenders.