Foxes Feast on Eco-Friendly Car Cables in Worthing, Forcing Owners to Take Action

Foxes in Worthing, West Sussex, have damaged at least 20 cars by eating soy-based insulation on brake wires. Car owners are wrapping their vehicles in tarpaulins to protect them from further damage.

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Nitish Verma
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Foxes Feast on Eco-Friendly Car Cables in Worthing, Forcing Owners to Take Action

Foxes Feast on Eco-Friendly Car Cables in Worthing, Forcing Owners to Take Action

In Worthing, West Sussex, a recent spate of attacks has left at least 20 cars damaged, with owners forced to wrap their vehicles in tarpaulins for protection. The culprits behind the attacks are believed to be foxes, which are attracted to the soy-based insulation on brake wires.

Why this matters: This incident highlights the unintended consequences of adoptingeco-friendly alternatives in the automotive industry, which can have significant implications for local wildlife and vehicle owners. It also raises questions about the suitability of these materials in the long run and the need for manufacturers to consider the potential impact of their sustainable solutions.

According to Jack Cousens, the AA's head of roads policy, "the animals may be attracted to the soy-based insulation on brake wires." This suggests that the eco-friendly soy-based brake cables may be the reason behind the foxes' interest in the cars.

The switch from petroleum-based insulation to soy-based alternatives on car parts, including brake wires, gearbox insulation, primer bulbs, and diesel injector wires, began in 2000 as a more environmentally friendly option. However, this change has inadvertently led to the current problem with foxes in Worthing.

As a result of the attacks, car owners have been compelled to take drastic measures to safeguard their vehicles. Recent photos show multiple cars covered in blue plastic tarpaulins to prevent further damage from the foxes.

The public has expressed frustration and concern over the use of soy-based products in vehicles. One commenter, Kenneth T., questioned the necessity of using soy-based insulation in brake wires, drawing parallels with genetically modified foods, stating, "I don't want this gmo'd food (hahaha) like product in my body, why would I want it on my vehicle?"

The situation in Worthing highlights the unintended consequences of adopting eco-friendly alternatives in the automotive industry. As manufacturers continue to seek more sustainable solutions, it is crucial to consider the potential impact on local wildlife and the practical implications for vehicle owners. The foxes' attraction to soy-based insulation has led to a significant number of damaged cars and raised questions about the suitability of these materials in the long run.

Key Takeaways

  • 20+ cars in Worthing, West Sussex damaged by foxes attracted to soy-based brake wire insulation.
  • Foxes eating eco-friendly brake cables made from soy, causing damage to vehicles.
  • Soy-based insulation used in cars since 2000 as a more environmentally friendly option.
  • Car owners forced to wrap vehicles in tarpaulins to protect from fox attacks.
  • Incident highlights unintended consequences of adopting eco-friendly alternatives in automotive industry.