Leeds City Council Announces £13 Million Energy Efficiency Scheme for Oldest Council Homes

Leeds City Council unveils £13M project to improve energy efficiency of oldest council homes, tackling fuel poverty and contributing to net-zero goals.

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Leeds City Council Announces £13 Million Energy Efficiency Scheme for Oldest Council Homes

Leeds City Council Announces £13 Million Energy Efficiency Scheme for Oldest Council Homes

Leeds City Council has unveiled plans for a £13 million project aimed at improving the energy efficiency of some of the oldest council houses in the city. The scheme will target homes in the deprived areas of Holbeck and Armley, with the goal of making these properties easier to heat and reducing fuel poverty among residents.

The back-to-back houses, built during the Industrial Revolution, have proven difficult to upgrade in the past due to the high cost of solid wall and attic room insulation. The new funding, which will largely come from the West Yorkshire Combined Authority and the government's Levelling Up Fund, is expected to help overcome these challenges.

Councilor Mohammed Rafique, Leeds City Council's executive member for environment and housing, said: "Everyone deserves to live in a warm home that is affordable to heat. This scheme will make a real difference to hundreds of council tenants who are struggling with high energy bills in some of our oldest and most inefficient properties."

Why this matters:Improving the energy efficiency of older homes is essential for reducing carbon emissions and tackling fuel poverty. The success of this project could pave the way for similar initiatives in other parts of the UK.

The scheme will involve installing insulation, replacing doors and windows, and upgrading heating systems in the selected homes. The work is expected to significantly improve the properties' Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) ratings, which currently stand at an average of band D or below.

While opposition parties have broadly welcomed the proposals, some have questioned whether the scheme will go far enough in addressing the energy efficiency issues of these older council homes. Councilor Andrew Carter, leader of the Conservative group, said: "We support any measures to improve the quality of council housing, but £13 million is a drop in the ocean compared to what is needed to bring all of Leeds' council homes up to a decent standard."

Leeds City Council has stated that the project will contribute to the city's ambitious target of achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2030. The local authority has already invested in a range of energy efficiency measures across its housing stock, including solar panels, heat pumps, and district heating systems.

The £13 million energy efficiency scheme for Leeds' oldest council homes is a significant step towards improving living conditions for residents and reducing the city's carbon footprint. As Councilor Rafique noted, "This project will not only make a real difference to people's lives but also contribute to our wider efforts to tackle the climate emergency and create a more sustainable future for Leeds."

Key Takeaways

  • Leeds City Council to invest £13M to improve energy efficiency of old council homes
  • Scheme targets deprived areas of Holbeck and Armley to reduce fuel poverty
  • Funding from West Yorkshire Combined Authority and Levelling Up Fund
  • Project aims to upgrade insulation, doors, windows, and heating systems
  • Scheme contributes to Leeds' goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2030