Model Sascha Bailey Reconsiders Transition After NHS Wait Times

Sascha Bailey, son of photographer David Bailey, considered transitioning to a woman after his marriage ended, but changed his mind after a new relationship. Delays in securing hormone replacement medicine from the NHS gave him time to reflect and ultimately decide not to transition.

author-image
Trim Correspondents
New Update
Model Sascha Bailey Reconsiders Transition After NHS Wait Times

Model Sascha Bailey Reconsiders Transition After NHS Wait Times

Sascha Bailey, a 29-year-old model and son of renowned photographer David Bailey, recently revealed his decision to remain a man after considering transitioning to a woman. Bailey's journey began after his marriage to Japanese lawyer Mimi Nishikawa ended, leading him to explore the "transmaxxing" subculture of men who believe transitioning will make their lives easier.

Why this matters: This story highlights the complexities and nuances of gender identity, underscoring the need for thoughtful consideration and reflection in the decision-making process. Moreover, it sheds light on the challenges faced by individuals navigating gender identity within the constraints of healthcare systems, sparking important conversations about access to care and support.

While living in Japan, Bailey had a brief 10-minute interview at a specialist gender clinic in Nagoya, where he was prescribed hormone replacement medicine. He planned to return to the UK and live as "Sacha" without the "s". However, delays in securing his second month's prescription from the NHS gave him time to reconsider his decision.

Bailey explained his struggles with male identity, stating, "I often found it hard growing up to identify with males and male characters. I used to love Ripley [played by Sigourney Weaver in Alien] because she was strong and she didn't represent the person who had hurt me; she looked sufficiently different." He viewed transitioning as a form of problem-solving, saying, "When you think about transmaxxers, you have to take away all the feelings and the internal stuff because what they're trying to do is make themselves right for the situation."

Sascha Bailey comes from a celebrated family in the fashion and photography world. His father, David Bailey, is a renowned photographer who has worked with famous models and celebrities. Sascha's mother, Catherine, is also a celebrated model. The family grew up in a bohemian environment with A-list connections. Sascha himself was educated privately at a specialist London school and signed by the prestigious Storm modeling agency at age 16.

Bailey met his ex-wife Mimi Nishikawa through a mutual friend and married her at the young age of 19, despite their 20-year age gap. The couple lived and worked in Japan before their marriage ended, prompting Bailey's exploration of gender identity. It was ultimately his new relationship with photographer Lucy Brown, a former assistant to Tommy Robinson, that led Bailey to reconsider transitioning. "She [Lucy Brown] repeated back my reasoning to me, and I just started laughing. It all unravelled from that point," Bailey explained.

Sascha Bailey's journey highlights the complex and personal nature of gender identity. While he ultimately chose not to transition, his story sheds light on the challenges faced by individuals grappling with these deeply personal decisions. The wait times within the NHS system inadvertently provided Bailey the space to reflect on his path forward, leading him to remain as he is. Bailey's experiences serve as a window into the highly individual process of navigating gender identity in today's society.

Key Takeaways

  • Sascha Bailey, 29, considered transitioning to a woman after his marriage ended.
  • He was prescribed hormone replacement medicine in Japan, but NHS delays made him reconsider.
  • Bailey struggled with male identity, seeing transitioning as a problem-solving approach.
  • A new relationship with Lucy Brown helped him realize transitioning wasn't the solution.
  • Bailey's story highlights the complexities and nuances of gender identity and decision-making.