Smartphone Hygiene: Survey Reveals Germ-Spreading Habits

A recent study by Dettol found that 60% of smartphone users take their devices into the bathroom, and half fail to sanitize them afterwards. The study highlights the importance of maintaining proper hygiene practices to reduce the spread of germs in households.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Smartphone Hygiene: Survey Reveals Germ-Spreading Habits

Smartphone Hygiene: Survey Reveals Germ-Spreading Habits

A recent study has shed light on the unhygienic smartphone habits of many users, potentially contributing to the spread of germs in households. The survey of 2,000 adults, conducted by Dettol, found that 60% of smartphone users take their devices into the bathroom, and half, users fail to sanitize their phones afterwards.

Why this matters: The spread of germs through smartphones can have significant implications for public health, particularly in households with vulnerable individuals such as the elderly or young children. By highlighting these habits, the survey aims to raise awareness and encourage individuals to take simple steps to reduce the transmission of germs and prevent the spread of illnesses.

This behavior can lead to the spread of germs to various surfaces within the home, as 57% of users place their phones on kitchen counters, 47% on dining tables, and 43% on their beds. The study also revealed that many common household items, such as TV remotes, salt and pepper shakers, kettles, condiments, and light switches, are rarely or never cleaned.

TV home expert and mother of four, Sarah Beeny, collaborated with Dettol to highlight the ease with which germs can spread. "With a large family of teenage boys at home, our TV remote gets quite the workout - and I really wasn't aware of how easily germs can be spread by the ones you love," Beeny said.

David Shillcock from Dettol emphasized the role people play in spreading germs, stating, "The results show that germs don't spread by themselves, people spread them, so when it comes to sharing lives together, our homes can be germier than we think."

The study found that 70% of people would be more inclined to disinfect items in their homes if they could physically see germs or bacteria. Additionally, 36% of respondents have used and shared the same hand towel at home for multiple uses, 27% let their pets climb on their furniture and bedding without disinfecting them, and 13% prepare food without washing their hands beforehand.

After being presented with facts about germs, 33% of participants said they would think differently about how germs spread, and 43% would be more likely to disinfect the items they share often. In response to these findings, Dettol has created a copper 'GermWare' range, a collection of antibacterial items made from copper, to encourage people to reduce the spread of germs.

The survey highlights the importance of maintaining proper hygiene practices when using smartphones and other frequently touched household items. By raising awareness about the potential for germ transmission and providing solutions like the GermWare range, Dettol aims to help individuals and families create healthier home environments.

Key Takeaways

  • 60% of smartphone users take devices into the bathroom, potentially spreading germs.
  • Half of users fail to sanitize their phones after bathroom use, further spreading germs.
  • Phones are often placed on kitchen counters, dining tables, and beds, spreading germs to these surfaces.
  • Common household items like TV remotes, salt shakers, and light switches are rarely or never cleaned.
  • 70% of people would disinfect more if they could see germs, highlighting the need for awareness and education.