Squatters Claim Deal to Stay in Gordon Ramsay's London Pub Despite Court Order

Squatters refuse to leave Gordon Ramsay's £13M London pub, claiming a deal with the owner, despite a court order. The dispute highlights legal issues around squatting and gentrification's impact on communities.

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Nitish Verma
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Squatters Claim Deal to Stay in Gordon Ramsay's London Pub Despite Court Order

Squatters Claim Deal to Stay in Gordon Ramsay's London Pub Despite Court Order

Squatters occupying celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay's York & Albany pub in London are refusing to leave the £13 million property, claiming they have reached a deal with the building's owner to remain as 'security' despite a High Court order secured by Ramsay's company to regain possession of the premises. The squatters, who have been running a free community cafe out of the building, say they made an agreement with the owner, Gary Love, not Ramsay, and intend to stay put.

Lawyers for Gordon Ramsay Holdings International Limited (GRHI) had secured a court order on Thursday for the possession of the property. However, the squatters tore down the court orders and have refused to leave. "We have made a deal with the owner, not Ramsay. We'll be staying here as security for the owner," one of the squatters stated. The former pub and hotel building is currently on the market after a protracted legal battle between Ramsay and Love, who purchased the freehold in 2007 and leased the pub to Ramsay.

While some squatters initially said they would comply with the court order, others have since returned, and it remains unclear how many are still inside the building. The squatters claim they are young, homeless individuals who have been occupying various locations and are trying to do a 'good thing' by providing a place to stay. They had been handing out free food and drink to "the people of Camden who have been victims of gentrification and parasitic projects like HS2."

Why this matters: The ongoing dispute between the squatters and Gordon Ramsay's company highlights the complex legal issues surrounding squatting and property rights in the UK. The situation also raises questions about the impact of gentrification on local communities and the challenges faced by homeless individuals in finding shelter.

Love has denied having any contact with the squatters or their representatives and stated that he has not made any agreement with them. The police have been called to the property, but no arrests have been made. The situation remains unresolved, with the squatters determined to stay despite the legal action taken by GRHI. The York & Albany pub has been closed during the handover period, and the squatters' occupation has been described as an "absolute nightmare scenario" for Ramsay.

Key Takeaways

  • Squatters occupy Gordon Ramsay's £13M pub in London, refuse to leave.
  • Squatters claim deal with owner, not Ramsay, to remain as 'security'.
  • Court order secured by Ramsay's company to regain possession, but squatters refuse to comply.
  • Squatters provide free food, claim to help victims of gentrification and HS2.
  • Dispute highlights legal issues around squatting and property rights in the UK.