40 First Responders Rescue Horses Trapped in Waist-Deep Mud

Nearly 40 first responders worked for five hours to rescue two horses stuck in waist-deep mud in a Connecticut woodland. The horses were successfully extracted using specialized equipment and were found to be in mild distress, but able to stand on their own after being warmed up.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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40 First Responders Rescue Horses Trapped in Waist-Deep Mud

40 First Responders Rescue Horses Trapped in Waist-Deep Mud

A dramatic rescue mission unfolded on Saturday, May 12, 2024, in the town of Lebanon, Connecticut, as nearly 40 first responders worked tirelessly for five hours to save two horses stuck in waist-deep mud. The horses had wandered into a swampy area of woodland behind a farm and became trapped up to their undersides.

The Lebanon Volunteer Fire Department (LVFD) received a call around 2 p.m. requesting assistance. Upon arrival, firefighters quickly realized the severity of the situation and called in the Durham Animal Response Team (DART) for their expertise in mud rescues and specialized equipment. To reach the horses, located about three-quarters of a mile into the woods, rescuers had to clear a path through the muddy terrain and construct a makeshift bridge using logs, cribbing, plywood, and signs to cross a river.

The Lebanon Volunteer Fire Department (LVFD) Chief Jay Schall explained the challenges the horses faced: "The more you try to get yourself out — and you can't — you kind of get yourself deeper in. And that's basically what happened to two of them. They were just really stuck." The rescue team used sleds and rope systems to carefully extract each horse, with the first taking nearly 30 minutes and the second, more deeply mired, over 30 minutes.

A veterinarian from Fenton River Vets assessed the horses at the scene, finding them in mild distress. One horse had been trapped in the mud and water for over seven hours. After being warmed up, both horses were able to stand on their own by 6:30 p.m. The LVFD shared the good news on Facebook: "We are happy to report both got up without issue and were happily eating some fresh hay."

The successful rescue mission exemplifies the bravery, skill, and dedication of first responders who face challenging and dangerous situations to protect lives, both human and animal. The horses, though exhausted and messy, were saved from a potentially fatal predicament thanks to the tireless efforts of the LVFD, DART, and all those who contributed to this remarkable operation.

Key Takeaways

  • 2 horses stuck in waist-deep mud in Lebanon, CT, rescued by 40 first responders.
  • Rescue mission took 5 hours, with responders clearing a path and building a makeshift bridge.
  • Horses were trapped up to their undersides, with one stuck for over 7 hours.
  • Rescuers used sleds and rope systems to extract the horses, with a vet assessing them on scene.
  • Both horses were able to stand on their own after being warmed up and fed fresh hay.