Cornell Colleges Receive Seed Grants for Innovative International Projects

Cornell University's Mario Einaudi Center awards seed grants to six faculty members to support internationally engaged research projects. The grants, capped at $10,000, will fund projects on global challenges, including healthcare delivery, sustainable infrastructure, and disarmament education.

author-image
Nitish Verma
New Update
Cornell Colleges Receive Seed Grants for Innovative International Projects

Cornell Colleges Receive Seed Grants for Innovative International Projects

The Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University has awarded seed grants to faculty members from six colleges and schools to support their internationally engaged research and teaching initiatives. Each grant, capped at $10,000, aims to catalyze interdisciplinary projects tackling global challenges.

Why this matters: These innovative projects have the potential to drive meaningful change in various global issues, from healthcare delivery to sustainable infrastructure design. By supporting interdisciplinary research, the seed grants can lead to breakthroughs that address complex challenges facing communities worldwide.

Among the funded projects is an investigation by Aleksandr Michuda from Cornell Information Science (CIS) into the welfare effects of drone-assisted healthcare delivery on migration decisions. Richard Geddes from the Cornell Brooks School of Public Policy will work on developing pathways to sustainable, resilient, and secure infrastructure to future-proof Ukraine's economy.

Other recipients include Angela from Cornell Law, who will explore the intersection of strikes and democracy; Rebecca Slayton from the College of Arts and Sciences, focusing on disarmament education in the framework of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons; and Aditya Vashistha from CIS, who will develop new approaches to identify and combat ableist content on social media in India.

Previous seed grant recipients have leveraged the funding to conduct impactful research. Beth Lyon from Cornell Law used her 2022 grant to test a theory on why farmworkers may be reluctant to file formal complaints about hazardous conditions or unfair labor practices. "We wouldn't have been able to do this work without the seed grant. We were very fortunate to have it, and the timing was perfect," said Lyon.

Eli Friedman from the ILR School utilized his 2023 seed grant to travel to Asia and study how various stakeholders in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Singapore have responded to economic changes following China's rise. Aditya Vashistha from CIS also received a 2023 grant to support fieldwork in India for a project on the spread of misinformation in private online environments.

Vashistha emphasized the importance of fieldwork for computer scientists, stating, "Fieldwork is a critical component of the kind of work we do. As a computer scientist, I could sit in my office and imagine what communities need. But if I can be on the ground, my students and I can really engage with the communities and get their feedback."

The Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies' seed grants continue to enable Cornell faculty to pursue groundbreaking research on pressing global issues. By supporting innovative projects across disciplines, the grants facilitate collaborations that generate new insights and solutions to complex challenges facing communities worldwide.

Key Takeaways

  • Cornell University's Mario Einaudi Center awards seed grants to 6 faculty members for global research initiatives.
  • Grants of up to $10,000 support interdisciplinary projects tackling global challenges like healthcare and infrastructure.
  • Projects include drone-assisted healthcare, sustainable infrastructure, and combatting ableist content on social media.
  • Previous grant recipients have conducted impactful research on farmworker rights and economic changes in Asia.
  • Seed grants enable faculty to pursue groundbreaking research and collaborations on pressing global issues.