Glenn Loury Releases Memoir Amid Spinal Surgery at 75

Glenn Loury, a 75-year-old Brown University professor, has released his memoir "Late Admissions: Confessions of a Black Conservative" amidst undergoing spinal stenosis surgery. The memoir offers a personal account of Loury's life, from teenage fatherhood to becoming the youngest African American granted tenure at Harvard.

author-image
Nitish Verma
New Update
Glenn Loury Releases Memoir Amid Spinal Surgery at 75

Glenn Loury Releases Memoir Amid Spinal Surgery at 75

Glenn Loury, a 75-year-old professor of social sciences and economics at Brown University, has released his memoir, "Late Admissions: Confessions of a Black Conservative," amidst undergoing spinal stenosis surgery. The memoir offers a personal and extraordinary account of Loury's tumultuous life, from his struggles as a teenage father on the South Side of Chicago to becoming the youngest African American granted tenure at Harvard.

Why this matters: Loury's memoir provides a unique perspective on the complexities of race and politics, offering insights into the experiences of a Black conservative who has navigated different ideological positions throughout his career. His story also highlights the importance of personal redemption and self-reflection in shaping one's beliefs and values.

Born in 1948, Loury's path to academic success was far from straightforward. He fathered two children as a teenager, worked in a printing plant, and attended community college before transferring to Northwestern University. After earning a Ph.D. from M.I.T., Loury made history at age 33 by securing tenure in Harvard's economics department.

However, Loury's memoir delves into more than just his professional achievements. He openly discusses his personal demons, including addiction to crack cocaine, nonpayment of child support, and numerous extramarital affairs. "I'm going to tell you things about myself that no one would want anybody to think was true of them," Loury writes, acknowledging the unflattering aspects of his life story.

Throughout his career, Loury's political views have shifted significantly. In the 1980s, he emerged as a prominent Black conservative, criticizing affirmative action and arguing that African Americans should take responsibility for their own lives. However, in the 1990s and 2000s, Loury's views swerved left before eventually returning to the right in recent years.

Despite his flaws and internal struggles, Loury claims to have found redemption through his commitment to the AME Church and his triumph over his demons. "I cannot defeat the enemy within, not entirely... For now, we hold an uneasy truce, one that requires long negotiations to maintain," he reflects in the memoir.

"Late Admissions: Confessions of a Black Conservative,"published by W.W. Norton Company, spans 428 pages and is priced at $32.50. The memoir has garnered mixed reviews, with some praising Loury's honesty and others questioning the depth of hisintrospectionon race and politics. As Loury recovers from his recent surgery, his memoir offers a complex portrait of a man grappling with his own identity, beliefs, and place in the world.