New Colonoscopy Detection Benchmarks Proposed by Researchers

Researchers propose new colonoscopy detection benchmarks based on a study of high-performing endoscopists in New Hampshire, aiming to improve detection rates and reduce negative colonoscopies. The proposed benchmarks include adenoma detection rates of at least 40% and sessile serrated lesions detection rates of 20%.

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Bijay Laxmi
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New Colonoscopy Detection Benchmarks Proposed by Researchers

New Colonoscopy Detection Benchmarks Proposed by Researchers

Researchers have proposed new detection benchmarks for colonoscopies based on a study of high-performing endoscopists in New Hampshire. The proposed benchmarks, published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology, aim to improve colonoscopy detection rates and reduce negative colonoscopies following positive stool tests.

Why this matters: Improving colonoscopy detection rates can lead to earlier identification and removal of precancerous polyps, ultimately reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer. Widespread adoption of these benchmarks could have a significant impact on public health, particularly in countries with high rates of colorectal cancer.

The study, led by Lynn F. Butterly, MD, of the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, suggests that higher endoscopist polyp detection rates are significantly associated with fewer negative colonoscopies after positive stool tests. Based on their findings, the researchers propose an adenoma detection rate of at least 40% (with 60% aspirational detection) following positive mt-sDNA or FIT tests.

Additionally, the proposed benchmarks include a sessile serrated lesions detection rate of 20% (with 30% aspirational detection) following positive mt-sDNA and a serrated polyp detection rate of 15% following a positive FIT. These benchmarks were derived from the performance of high-performing endoscopists in the New Hampshire population studied.

The authors acknowledge that the study was limited to a relatively racially homogeneous population in New Hampshire, which may affect the generalizability of the findings. They emphasize the need for further validation of the proposed benchmarks in other, more diverse populations.

This research was supported by a grant to the New Hampshire Colonoscopy Registry from Exact Sciences. One of the study authors is an employee of Exact Sciences.

The proposed colonoscopy detection benchmarks have the potential to improve patient outcomes by increasing detection of precancerous polyps and reducing the incidence of negative colonoscopies following positive stool-based screening tests. However, further research is needed to validate these benchmarks in more diverse patient populations and assess their impact on colorectal cancer screening effectiveness.

Key Takeaways

  • Researchers propose new colonoscopy detection benchmarks to improve detection rates.
  • Benchmarks aim to reduce negative colonoscopies after positive stool tests.
  • Proposed adenoma detection rate: ≥40% (60% aspirational) after positive mt-sDNA/FIT tests.
  • Other proposed benchmarks: 20% for sessile serrated lesions, 15% for serrated polyps.
  • Further research needed to validate benchmarks in diverse populations.