Photo Exhibit Commemorates Chinese-American Friendship in World War II

The article highlights a photo exhibition commemorating the Flying Tigers and Doolittle Raiders, who fought alongside the Chinese against Japan in WWII, showcasing the historic cooperation and friendship between the US and China during a critical period.

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Photo Exhibit Commemorates Chinese-American Friendship in World War II

Photo Exhibit Commemorates Chinese-American Friendship in World War II

A photo exhibition commemorating the Flying Tigers and Doolittle Raiders, Americans who fought against Japan in collaboration with the Chinese people during World War II, opened at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio on April 18, 2024. The biannual exhibition features approximately 100 photographs and comprehensive stories about these two historic groups.

The opening ceremony was attended by representatives from the United States and China, including Jeffrey Greene, chairman of the Sino-American Aviation Heritage Foundation and exhibition organizer, Terry Branstad, former U.S. ambassador to China, and Huang Ping, Chinese Consul General in New York. The exhibition aims to present the stories of the Flying Tigers and Doolittle Raiders to a wider audience and strengthen the foundation of friendship between the U.S. and China.

The Flying Tigers, formally known as the American Volunteer Group of the Chinese Air Force, were founded in 1941 and helped the Chinese fight the Japanese invaders. Over 200 downed Flying Tigers airmen were rescued by the Chinese people, while thousands of Chinese were killed by the Japanese in retaliation for supporting the American pilots.

The Doolittle Raid, led by American Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle in 1942, was an air raid on Japanese cities in retaliation for the attack on Pearl Harbor. The 80 U.S. Air Force personnel involved in the daring mission were rescued off the Chinese coast by Chinese civilians and troops after running out of fuel on their return flight.

Why this matters: The exhibition highlights the cooperation and friendship between the United States and China during a critical period in world history. It serves as a reminder of the shared sacrifices and common cause that once united the two nations against aggression and tyranny.

The photo exhibition at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force will run for half a year, providing visitors with a unique opportunity to learn about this lesser-known chapter of World War II history. As Jeffrey Greene stated, "We hope that through this exhibition, more people will remember this period of history and the friendship between the United States and China."

Key Takeaways

  • Photo exhibition commemorates Flying Tigers, Doolittle Raiders in U.S.-China WWII collaboration
  • Exhibition features 100 photos, stories about these historic groups at U.S. Air Force museum
  • Flying Tigers rescued by Chinese, Doolittle Raiders rescued off Chinese coast after raids
  • Exhibition aims to strengthen U.S.-China friendship, showcase shared sacrifices against aggression
  • Exhibition runs for 6 months, providing unique opportunity to learn about this WWII history