Short Videos Help Patients Discuss Diabetes Deprescribing

Researchers at the 2024 American Geriatrics Society meeting presented a study on the Prepare for Your Diabetes Care (PREPARE T2D) program, which uses short videos to empower patients with type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment, and their caregivers, to discuss deprescribing with clinicians, with the goal of improving healthcare outcomes and reducing medication-related risks. This description focuses on the primary topic (the PREPARE T2D program), the main entities (researchers, patients, caregivers, and clinicians), the context (the 2024 American Geriatrics Society meeting), and the significant actions and implications (using short videos to facilitate deprescribing discussions and improve healthcare outcomes). The description also provides objective and relevant details that will help an AI generate an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as the use of short videos and the involvement of patients, caregivers, and clinicians.

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Short Videos Help Patients Discuss Diabetes Deprescribing

Short Videos Help Patients Discuss Diabetes Deprescribing

Researchers at the 2024 American Geriatrics Society meeting presented a study on the Prepare for Your Diabetes Care (PREPARE T2D) program, which found that short videos helped patients with type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment, and their caregivers, discuss deprescribing with clinicians. The study, conducted at Kaiser Permanente in northern California, involved 9 patient-caregiver dyads who watched four short videos, up to 5 minutes each, on diabetes care, medication risks, and strategies for discussing deprescribing.

Why this matters: This study's findings have significant implications for improving healthcare outcomes for older adults with type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment, a growing demographic that often faces complex medication regimens. By empowering patients and caregivers to engage in informed conversations with clinicians, this approach can help reduce medication-related risks and improve overall health.

A qualitative analysis revealed that the videos improved patients' and caregivers' understanding of type 2 diabetes, hypoglycemia monitoring, medication risks, and strategies for discussing deprescribing with clinicians. Patients and caregivers reported that the videos "bridged the gap between patient and doctor" and provided "concrete examples of physician and patient communication." However, some caregivers still felt hesitant to speak up with clinicians, while others were confused about who to discuss deprescribing with - their primary clinician or specialist. Patients with cognitive impairment also reported difficulty understanding and remembering key program points without caregiver assistance.

The PREPARE T2D program was specifically adapted for people aged 75 and older who have mild cognitive impairment or early Alzheimer's disease, as well as their caregivers. Patients in the study had been prescribed insulin or sulfonylureas and had an A1c value of 8% or lower. The program included written action plans to help patients initiate conversations with clinicians about deprescribing.

The study, presented by Clarissa Ferguson, MPH, program coordinator at UCSF School of Medicine and funded by the National Institutes of Health, suggests that short videos may help facilitate deprescribing as part of effective type 2 diabetes interventions for older patients with cognitive impairment and their caregivers. However, the researchers noted that further refinements to the program, such as offering online and written formats and simplifying information, are needed to improve its impact.

Key Takeaways

  • Short videos helped patients with type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment discuss deprescribing with clinicians.
  • Videos improved patients' and caregivers' understanding of diabetes care and medication risks.
  • Patient-caregiver dyads reported improved communication with clinicians after watching videos.
  • Program was adapted for patients aged 75+ with mild cognitive impairment and their caregivers.
  • Further refinements, such as online formats and simplified information, are needed to improve impact.