Tornadoes Cause Extensive Damage in Coshocton County, Ohio

Two EF-1 tornadoes touched down in Coshocton County, Ohio, causing extensive damage to homes and trees with wind speeds of 105 mph and 100 mph. Fortunately, no injuries were reported, but the event highlights the importance of disaster preparedness and emergency response planning.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Tornadoes Cause Extensive Damage in Coshocton County, Ohio

Tornadoes Cause Extensive Damage in Coshocton County, Ohio

On May 11, 2024, two minor tornadoes touched down in Coshocton County, Ohio, near the Muskingum County line, causing extensive damage to homes and trees. The tornadoes, both categorized as EF-1, had wind speeds of 105 mph and 100 mph, respectively.

Why this matters: The occurrence of tornadoes in Coshocton County serves as a reminder of the importance of disaster preparedness and emergency response planning, especially in regions prone tosevere weather events. The impact of these tornadoes on local communities and infrastructure highlights the need for continued investment in weather forecasting and warning systems.

The first tornado touched down at approximately 12:02 a.m. in Muskingum County, about three miles north of Frazeysburg. With peak winds of 100 mph, it traveled a path length of 0.42 miles and had a maximum width of 128 yards. The tornado caused notable damage to a barn and home, snapping and uprooting trees before lifting.

The second tornado touched down at approximately 12:18 a.m. four miles north of Dresden in Coshocton County. With top winds of 105 mph, it had a path length of 0.10 miles and a maximum width of 197 yards. This tornado caused significant damage to a house, including blowing in walls, ripping off the roof, and throwing debris across a field.

Fortunately, no injuries were reported from either tornado. However, the area of Conesville also experienced damage to trees and homes, which the National Weather Service determined to have been caused by straight-line winds. Rob McMasters, Coshocton County EMA director, noted, "It was a day and night difference from what we were seeing damage wise compared to what we were seeing across from Cleveland Cliffs."

This marks the sixth confirmed tornado in Coshocton County since 1950 and the first since May 31, 1985. For Muskingum County, it is the 21st tornado since 1950, with the most recent occurring in April of this year. Thenational, twoshort-lived tornadoes in Coshocton County serve as a stark reminder of the power and unpredictability of severe weather events. As communities assess the damage and begin the recovery process, the importance of preparedness and collaboration between local agencies and the National Weather Service is underscored.